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Get drunk . . . on words!

Think of Lit Crawl Seattle as a free cool reading at your favorite bar, times about 30. For one beautiful and awesomely weird night, over 80 Pacific Northwest readers and artists fill Capitol and First Hill bars with stories ranging from oyster foraging to the Jesus movement, photography of Seattle outcasts and innocents, to odes to football and salt.

In past years, we’ve hosted everyone from former National Book Award finalist Jess Walter to Lindy West. Throughout the years, we have hosted readings by VIDA, Tin House, critically-acclaimed artists such as Eileen Myles and Melissa Febos, and much more, at venues throughout the neighborhood—including Hugo House, Vermilion, Capitol Cider, Capitol Hill Library, and Elliott Bay Book Company.

In 2019, we’ll continue our tradition of 5 phases of programming: 5-5:45pm, 6-6:45pm, 7-7:45pm, 8-8:45pm, and 9-9:45pm, plus literary shenanigans at the after party at 10pm.

This year, you’ll get to take in 35+ readings and 80+ readers and performers on this year’s line up!
Save the date: Thursday, October 24th, 2019.

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Thursday, October 24
 

5:00pm

A Reading with JMase III, Luzviminda Carpentar, Ana Walker and Nic Masangkay
We crawl... run, roll, struggle, and thrive through intersections as Trans and Queer Black and Brown folks. We roam our communities, creating joy and sharing vulnerability and heartache with music and poetry. It’s a movement - and for one night, find Ana Walker, Luzviminda “Lulu” Carpenter, J Mase III, and Nic Masangkay in one spot, together offering their work as local TQPOC arts activists.  

Featured Artists
Singer-songwriter, music producer, and poet Nic Masangkay came of age in the mid-2000s, crooning along to anything that resonated: from Usher and Alicia Keys’ “My Boo” to Green Day’s “Boulevard of Broken Dreams.” Masangkay was drawn to songs that allowed their pre-teen, closeted self to embody their truth. Years later, now openly queer and trans, they synthesize their eclectic inspiration and lived experience into a multidisciplinary arts perspective. Pop, electronic, R&B, soul, punk, alternative, hip-hop, and spoken word are all genres echoed throughout Masangkay’s sound and performance. The unifying result: fierce and captivating art that is creative as it is authentic.

J Mase III is a Black/trans/queer poet & educator based in Seattle, by way of Philly. He is the author of “If I Should Die Under the Knife, Tell my Kidney I was the Fiercest Poet Around”, as well as “And Then I Got Fired: One Transqueer’s Reflections on Grief, Unemployment, and Inappropriate Jokes about Death”.
As an educator, J Mase has worked with thousands of community members in the US, the UK, and Canada on the needs of LGBTQIA youth and adults in spaces such as K-12 schools, universities, faith communities, and restricted care facilities among others.

He is the founder of awQward, the first ever trans and queer people of color specific talent agency. Currently, he is co-editing The #BlackTransPrayerBook with awQward artist Lady Dane Figueroa Edidi.
As a performer, he has shared stages with world renowned artists like Chuck D and the Indigo Girls. His work and musings have been featured on MSNBC, NBC OUT, Essence Live, Atlanta Black Star, GO Magazine, Believe Out Loud, Everyday Feminism, Black Girl Dangerous, Upworthy, the New York Times, Buzzfeed, the Root, the Huffington Post and more.

Ana Walker is a queer person of color raised in Seattle, Washington. Ana writes to heal, question themself and the society they live in, and practice vulnerability. Their accomplishments include: going to Brave New Voices on the Youth Speaks Seattle team twice, performing at venues such as Town Hall, the Seattle Art Musuem, and Bumbershoot. Their main sources of inspiration are Social Justice Issues and the nuances of growing up.

Luzviminda Uzuri “Lulu” Carpenter is the 5th-8th Grade Performance & Media Arts Teacher, 8th Grade Production Teacher, and 8th Grade Advisor. She is a performance artist, radio host, producer, promoter, consultant, and community organizer and came to SGS as a cultural worker & cultural strategist who utilizes art and education to prevent violence with youth, young adults, and other marginalized communities. Currently, she is working on a storytelling project and educational institute with Alphabet Alliance of Color (AAoC) which she found in 2017 and supports the allyship among communities of color that identify as Queer and Trans and serves on the Teacher Advisory Board at MoPop Museum. She integrates the ideas of somatics (body), voice, art, performance, radio, and media justice through building curriculum and practices to empower students to take ownership and (re)create their image through photography and video. She has worked and performed for over 14 years in Seattle with community organizations, such as Ladies First Project of Communities Against Rape and Abuse (CARA), VoicesRising, Asian Pacific Islander Women and Family Safety Center (now APIChaya), Pinay sa Seattle (now GABRIELA-Seattle). She was an ambassador forOnTheBoards (OTB), to make connections between community, social justice, and innovative art and performances. Ms. Lulu has also served as a Commissioner and Co-Chair of the City of Seattle LGBT Commission and worked as a consultant at organizations such as Roots Young Adult Shelter when she was not performing on stage, on radio, or in a middle school classroom.

Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Shafer Baillie Mansion Bed & Breakfast 907 14th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

5:00pm

A Woman's Work--A Reading About Work and Labor
From the Second Shift to the Gender Pay Gap, there are myriad reasons women feel like they're just ""a step on the boss-man's ladder."" Yet, women make up nearly half of the labor force. This event features three female authors reading about work and labor: Kristen Millares Young, Jane Hodges, and Jean Ferruzola. Nicole Keenan-Lai, Executive Director of Puget Sound Sage, will host.

Featured Artists

Jane Hodges is a Seattle-based writer and the founder of Mineral School, an artists' residency near Mt. Rainier. Her fiction has appeared in The Brooklyn Review and her essays have appeared in The Seattle Weekly, The Magazine, and Seal Press anthologies. She is working on a memoir about the fallout from her Southern family's loss of wealth in a 1970s Ponzi scheme.

Kristen Millares Young is the author of the novel Subduction (Red Hen Press, April 14, 2020). A prize-winning journalist and essayist, Kristen is the current Prose Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House. Her writing appears in the Washington Post, the Guardian, Poetry Northwest, Crosscut, Hobart, Proximity and Moss, as well as the anthologies Pie & Whiskey, Latina Outsiders, and Advanced Creative Nonfiction (Bloomsbury, 2021). She was the researcher for the New York Times team that produced “Snow Fall,” which won a Pulitzer and a Peabody. Kristen serves as board chair of InvestigateWest, a nonprofit newsroom she co-founded in 2009.

Jean Ferruzola received her MFA from the University of Washington and was a 2014/15 Made at Hugo House fellow. Her writing has appeared in The Los Angeles Review, Brevity, The Offing, Entropy Magazine, and ELLE Magazine among others. She was a recipient of Artist Trust’s Grants for Artist Projects in 2016. You can follow her work at jeanferruzola.com.

Nicole Keenan-Lai got her start as a cleaner at a children's clothing store. Since then, she's cleaned hundreds of toilets, toured the world as a musician, walked thousands of dogs, served thousands of meals, contributed to books, crafted reports covered by international media, co-founded a thriving worker center, served as an adviser to countless labor-standards campaigns across the country, and co-crafted climate policy that shaped the presidential debate. Most importantly: she is the big sister to six, a wife, and still a musician.


Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Intrigue Chocolate 1520 15th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

5:00pm

An Evening with Robert Francis Flor, Kathya Alexander, and Mary Anne Moorman
There was life in Seattle's Central District and beyond. Kids grew up playing ball, eating their mama's feasts, welcoming newcomers. For awhile everybody was at home. Then came displacement. Join three artists exploring growing up, moving in, stepping out in a place they were once safe and belonged.There was life in Seattle's Central District and beyond. Kids grew up playing ball, eating their mama's feasts, welcoming newcomers. For awhile everybody was at home. Then came displacement. Join three artists exploring growing up, moving in, stepping out in a place they were once safe and belonged.

Featured Artists

Robert Francis Flor, PHD, is a Seattle native raised in the city’s Central Area and Rainier Valley. His poems appeared in Raven Chronicles, the Soundings Review, Four Cornered Universe, 4 and 20 Journal, the Wanderlust Journal, the Tamafyhr Mountain Poetry Review, the Baseball Bard, Poets Against the War, the Seattle Post Intelligencer (2005), the Field of Mirrors anthology (2008) and Poetry on the Bus (2014). In 2012, several poems will be published in two anthologies “Voices of the Asian American Experience” by the University of Santa Cruz and “Where Are You From?” the Thymos Book Project, Portland, Oregon. His chapbook “Alaskero Memories” was published in 2017. Also a playwright, his play “Mabuhay Majesty” was performed in 2017 at the Rainier Arts Center and his four short plays in 2018 at the Filipino Community Center. He is currently completing “The FAYTS – The Filipino American Young Turks”, a full-length play.

Kathya Alexander is a writer, actor, storyteller, and teaching artist. Her writing has appeared in ColorsNW Magazine, Arkana Magazine, Raising Lilly Ledbetter, and the Pitkin Review. She has won the Jack Straw Artist Support Program Award; 4Culture’s Artists Projects Award; and the WRAP Award, Youth Arts Award, and the CityArtist Award from Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Her play, HomeGoing, was chosen for residency at Hedgebrook Women’s Writer's Retreat and her play, Black To My Roots: African American Tales from the Head and the Heart, won the Edinburgh Festival Fringe First Award in Edinburgh, Scotland for Outstanding New Production.

Mary Anne Moorman is a writer, performer, teacher and radio host working at the intersection of family, social justice and story. Recipient of 4Culture, King County, the City of Seattle, Commonwealth of Virginia, Massachusetts Arts Commission grants, she is a producer/director and writer of over 250 industrial videos, authored numerous manuals, and workbooks on the prevention of sexual and racial discrimination training on multi-cultural pluralism. Moorman is co- author of plays including “The Grand Imperialist Circus,” “Revolution,” “Foolery”, “I’d Hang Too”, “White Flight, Black Ground.” Her stories and poems have appeared in the Yale Drama Review, Sewanee Review, “The Shenandoah Literary Review”, “National Storytelling Magazine”, Landmark News Service, Knight Ryder News Service, “Utilities Fortnightly,” “American Public Power” “Bent Chap Book,” “Line Art Chapbook,” “Seventeen Magazine “and “The Stranger.” She has received awards from: the American Press Association, American Psychological Association, Virginia Commonwealth University, Drama Critics of the South, Virginia Press Association and Virginia Arts and Humanities. Washington State Sex Equity Commission, Women Plus Business, Society for Human Resources Management and City University. A founding board member of Women in Trades, she currently serves on the board of FAR-West Music Conference, Seattle Storytellers Guild, and Women Against Violence.



Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Fuel Coffee 610 19th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

5:00pm

How Many Voices Does It Take
This workshop is for fiction writers and storytellers of all levels who are interested in telling one story from multiple points of view. Why tell one story from more than one perspective? What can perspective shifts do for storytelling? What happens when writing from multiple points of view also means writing across differences in identity? How and when do writers decide to shift point of view? What about moving between first and third person? In this forty-five minute workshop, writers will try a fun and motivating point of view writing exercise, look at examples from a variety of fiction writers working in this mode, and walk away with new skill-building suggestions for fiction writing from multiple perspectives.

TICKETS $5
Link to Tickets: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/user/eventreports.html?events=4413665

Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Hugo House 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

5:00pm

Stinky and Spooky with a Side of Magic
Three wonderful local children’s authors will share diverse but equally entertaining readings from their works. We’ll meet a Mexican boogeyman, a bear with a wish (that actually gets granted) and a middle schooler who can really fart. Features Mark Maciejewski author of the “I am Fartacus” series and new works by Donna Barba Higuera’s and Kim Baker.




Featured Artists:




Donna grew up in the oilfields of central California, where chupacabras posed as coyotes and La Llorona disguised herself as dust devils. Donna melds folklore with her own life experiences to reinvent storylines for her MG and picture books. Donna lives in Washington State with her family, three dogs and three two frogs, and five glow-in-the-dark fish. Donna's backyard is a haunted 19th century logging camp. (The haunted part may or may not be true—she makes stuff up.)




Kim Baker has worked as teacher, crisis counselor, waitress and mail sorter. She was born in Wyoming to a Mexican-American mother and white father, a heritage that informs her works. She is the author of the critically acclaimed book Pickle: The Formerly Anonymous Prank Club of Fountain Point Middle School. It was selected for the 2018 Global Reading Challenge and winner of the 2013 Crystal Kite West award from the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, among numerous other honors. Her latest book, The Waters Bear, will hit shelves in April 2020. Kimbakerbooks.com




Mark Maciejewski is the author of I Am Fartacus, and the Kirkus-starred I Am Fartacus: Electric Boogerloo. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, gardening, watching movies, and napping. His love of comics and graphic novels is a major influence on his work. He lives in Seattle with his wife, kids, three dogs, two frogs, and a bunch of glow-in-the-dark fish. You can find him at MarkMaciejewski.com or on Twitter @Magicjetski


Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Capitol Hill Branch - Seattle Public Library 425 Harvard Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

5:00pm

Stories, Refusals, and Songs at Night
Tina Blade, Kat Humphrey, Emily Orrson, and Sarah Stuteville comprise a multi-genre, multi-generational slate of women writers whose topics include mental health and motherhood; the art of sleep deprivation; glamorous ways of saying no; and how Baba Yaga confronts ageism.

Featured Artists:

Kat Humphrey has taught creative writing; worked as an art therapist; curated art shows and a short lecture series; exhibited her artwork; and published poetry, journalism, and jokes. She's told true personal stories onstage without notes, in the style of those on The Moth Radio Hour. One of her favorite moments as a teacher was when a second grader asked her, "Miss Kat, does your hair want to be doing that?"

Tina Blade lives in Washington State's Snoqualmie Valley just east of Seattle. Her poems have appeared in numerous publications, including Tulip Tree Review, Mid-American Review, California Quarterly, Calyx, and Seattle Review. She is currently working on her chapbook, Pomegranate.

Sarah Stuteville is a writer, memoirist, writing educator and nonprofit media consultant. A former journalist with a passion for storytelling, Sarah has reported from over a dozen countries in the Middle East, East Africa, South Asia and the Former Soviet Union. She wrote a column for the Seattle Times on social justice issues. She helped to co-found The Seattle Globalist, a non-profit journalism organization that trains diverse media makers.

Her memoir writing has been published in Mutha (where her piece, “No One is Watching” was one of the most read on the site all year) and Prometheus Dreaming and her piece, “Windstorm,” won “Honorable Mention” in the Hunger Mountain Nonfiction Writing Contest this year. She is currently working on a memoir, “Staring Problem,” about feminism, journalism, motherhood and mental health.


Emily Orrson is a writer. She is the founder and director of the Magazine of Glamorous Refusal, a pop art magazine about saying no in a world that conditions us to say yes. Seattle Magazine named her Seattleite of the month in April 2019 for her work glamorizing refusal in our community. She is a featured contributor on HuffPost.



Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Bites Of Bangkok 340 15th Ave E #201, Seattle, WA 98102

5:00pm

Y-We Poetry Reading
Y-WE cultivates the power of diverse young women to be creative leaders and courageous changemakers through transformative programs within a collaborative community of belonging. We envision a society rooted in social justice, where all young women live their truth, achieve their dreams, and change our world.

Reading will feature: Robin Hall, Azure Savage and Lucia Santos

Featured Artists:

Samantha Pak is Seattle-area native who has been working in journalism since 2008. She graduated with a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Washington and is senior editor for Sound Publishing's Eastside media group, where she writes a bimonthly column called Windows and Mirrors, which focuses on telling the stories of people whose voices are not often heard. She also writes book recommendations for the Northwest Asian Weekly. In her spare time, she enjoys reading and volunteers as a mentor for Young Women Empowered, a local nonprofit focused on building leadership skills in teenaged girls.

Robin Hall is a 18 year old college student at Bellevue College. She is excited to share her book with the world, and hopes that it will inspire ideas, and deepen connections. Robin is a passionate artist, and is looking forward to creating more with her project.

Azure Savage is a high school senior, and this past summer he finished and self-published his first book “You Failed Us: students of color talk Seattle schools.” The book explores the racism within schools from the perspective of students of color. Azure uses his own experiences and those of his peers to illustrate the systematic issues at hand. He aims to center the voices of marginalized students throughout the push for equity in schools.

Lucia Santos is a 16-year-old artist and writer from Seattle, Washington. She attends The Center School and Seattle Central Community College. She has been a participant in Young Women Empowered since 2017 and has attended the Y-WE Write summer program for two years. Lucia values learning about the world around her and sharing this knowledge through creativity. As an artist, Lucia works primarily through painting as well as
 written pieces and has shared her work at the 2019 Hedgebrook gala, at AXIS Gallery in Pioneer Square, and as a contributing illustrator for Rookie Magazine.



Thursday October 24, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm
Northwest Film Forum 1515 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

International Girl Gang Tales
International Girl Gang Tales is about womxn/femmes of color who grew up watching their parents send money via Western Union to family in the homeland and making long distance calls with international calling cards. For girls who switch between codes and languages, girls who message their family on WhatsApp. Girls who were told they had difficult names to pronounce. Girls who collect stamps in their passport, girls who dream of a faraway (or nearby) land, still have foreign currency in their wallets. Girls who have had international flings, keep coming home to something nowhere else has. Indigenous girls reppin their tribe and their clan, their corner of the earth. International Girl Gang tales are many different stories from everywhere.

Featured Organization

Women.Weed.Wifi is an expansive, international, and intergalactic network of women of color artists that use our ancestral and learned knowledge; our melanin, spiritual guides, and our natural talents to teach through holistic healing and plant magic.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Shafer Baillie Mansion Bed & Breakfast 907 14th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

6:00pm

Youth Poet Laureate Reading
The Seattle Youth Poet Laureate (YPL) program aims to identify youth writers and leaders who are committed to poetry, performance, civic and community engagement, education, and equity across the Puget Sound region. This year's Lit Crawl will feature members of the YPL cohort, including Youth Poet Laureate Wei-Wei Lee, Youth Poet Laureate Ambassador Maia Pody, and Youth Poet Laureate Finalist Marina Chen.

Featured Artists:

Wei-Wei Lee (Youth Poet Laureate) is seventeen years old and attends Nathan Hale High School. She grew up in Taiwan, but was born in the States, and Seattle is the first city in the States she has ever known and loved. As the 2019/2020 Youth Poet Laureate, she hopes to pay tribute to both Taiwan and America in her writing, and she hopes to do them proud.

Maia Pody (Youth Poet Laureate Ambassador) is in her senior year at The Center School. She has been writing poetry for the entirety of her high school career, and a little bit before that as well. She likes to write about herself and other people, and she takes inspiration from books, films, and the world around her. Several of her poems can be found online, via the Seattle Arts and Lectures and Town Hall Seattle blogs. She is interested in science, literature, and the culture of the city of Seattle, where she has lived all her life. 

Marina Chen (Youth Poet Laureate Finalist) is a high schooler and poet from the greater Seattle area. Her work has been recognized by the National Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, AIPF, Live Poets Society of New Jersey, and others. She is published in Urban Galaxy: the Female Renaissance, the 2019 edition of the journal; she is honored to be a member of the Seattle Youth Poet Laureate cohort.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Capitol Hill Branch - Seattle Public Library 425 Harvard Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

6:00pm

A Bunch of Sad Hot Trash
Sarah Galvin, Rich Smith, Corinne Manning, and Bill Carty turn the clock back to age 18, sharing work (new and old) that showcases the messes they are, were, and have been.  

Featured Artists

Sarah Galvin is a the author of Ugly Time, The Three Einsteins and The Best Party of our Lives; contributor to The Guardian, Vice Magazine, The Stranger, and City Arts; and also a human bottle rocket. She has an MFA in poetry from the University of Washington.

Rich Smith writes about politics, books, and theater at The Stranger. He’s the author of Great Poem of Desire and Other Poems and All Talk, both from Poor Claudia.

Bill Carty is the author of Huge Cloudy (Octopus Books). He has received poetry fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Artist Trust, the Hugo House, and Jack Straw. He was awarded the 2017 Emily Dickinson Award from the Poetry Society of America, and his poems have recently appeared in the Boston Review, Ploughshares, Pinwheel, Iowa Review, Conduit, Warscapes, and other journals. Bill is Senior Editor at Poetry Northwest and teaches at Hugo House, the UW Robinson Center for Young Scholars, and Edmonds Community College.

Corinne Manning is a prose writer and literary organizer whose debut story collection WE HAD NO RULES is forthcoming from Arsenal Pulp Press, 2020. Their essays and stories have been published widely and most recently anthologized in Toward an Ethics of Activism and Shadow Map: An anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault. Once Upon a time they founded the James Franco Review, a literary intervention project that addressed implicit bias in the publishing industry.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Hugo House 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Booktoberfest: Poems to Scare the Hell Out of You!

Welcome to our library of horrors as we share contemporary and classic poems to unsettle, disturb and terrify. Part of LitCrawl 2019 & Booktoberfest!

Shambling spirits and serial killers, and things that stare at you from pickling jars: this is not your usual poetry reading. Librarians Misha Stone and David Wright welcome you to their little library of horrors with a captivating reading of contemporary and classic verse to unsettle, disturb and terrify. Come shiver in the darkness with this nightmarish start to your Hallowe’en week.

 This program is a part of Booktoberfest, our annual celebration of books, beer and good cheer taking place in bars and pubs across the Seattle. Join us for Karaoke, a trilogy of Trivia nights, Drink & Draw, ‘Ales from the Crypt spooky stories in bars, Hallowe’en Horror Movie Marathon, and more! 

Be on the lookout for our Booktoberfest Drink Coasters at all events, and at bars all across the city. Find our full roster of events at www.spl.org/booktoberfest

This event is 21 and over. Registration is not required. This event is free, although drinks and food are not. 

Calendar Entry: https://www.spl.org/event-calendar?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D135198834

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Capitol Cider 818 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Coast|No Coast Issue 2 Preview with Writers and Editors
Come to check out fresh work from COAST|noCOAST Issue 2 contributors, comix artist and poet Mita Mahato, writer and comedian Alayna Becker, and two of the journal's editors, Erich Schweikher and Katie Lee Ellison.  

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Vermillion Art Gallery & Bar 1508 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Crab Creek Review Fall Release!
Crab Creek Review is celebrating their fall release with some of their favorite poets! Featuring Crab Creek Prize winner Margot Kahn and semi-finalist Cali Kopczick among others, this event celebrates the great voices Crab Creek Review has had the chance to read and publish throughout 2019.


Featured Artists:

Margot Kahn is the author of the biography Horses That Buck and co-editor of the collections This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home and the forthcoming Wanting: Women Writing About Desire. Her work has appeared in Lenny Letter, The Rumpus, The Los Angeles Review, Portland Review, Whiskey Island, and elsewhere, and her poem “Winter” was selected by Jericho Brown as the winner of the 2019 Crab Creek Review Poetry Prize.

Cali Kopczick is a writer and editor based in Seattle, Washington. She was the editor for Chin Music Press and is the production manager and story editor of the documentary Where the House Was. Her writing is out or forthcoming with The Offing, The Birds We Piled Loosely, Bone Bouquet, and Crab Creek Review, among others.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Ada's Technical Books & Cafe 425 15th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

6:00pm

Get Mineral Schooled!
Come hear alums from the Mt. Rainier artists' residency share from their work, including poet Jill Bergantz Carley, young adult fiction author Karen Finneyfrock, essayist JM Wong and YA author Stephanie Kuehnert.

Featured Artists

Jill Bergantz Carley '17 (jillbergantzcarley.com) of Calaveras County, California, has published poetry in Opossum, Entropy, Silver Needle, Collective Unrest, The Hellebore, and beyond. A Pushcart Prize nominee, her chapbook Animal Vegetable Mineral is forthcoming from Uncollected Press in 2020. Her conceptual textile sculpture work has been shown at bg Gallery, CTRL Collective, and the de Young Museum.

Karen Finneyfrock '16 (www.karentfinneyfrock.com) of Seattle is a poet and novelist. She is the author of the young adult novels The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door and Starbird Murphy and the World Outside, both published by Viking Children's Books, as well as the poetry collection Ceremony for the Choking Ghost (Write Bloody). A former Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House, she teaches in Seattle's Writers-in-the-Schools program.

Stephanie Kuehnert (www.stephaniekuehnert.com) is the author of the Young Adult novels, I WANNA BE YOUR JOEY RAMONE and BALLADS OF SUBURBIA, both published by MTV Books. Her memoir, PIECES OF A GIRL, is forthcoming from Dutton Young Readers. She has been a contributing writer to Rookie magazine and Jezebel.

JM Wong '19 is a Seattle-based writer, translator, and organizer. They care about issues related to gender, labor, race, and incarceration. Their work has appeared in The Nation, The Seattle Globalist, and elsewhere, and they also translate poetry from Chinese into English.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Highline Bar 210 Broadway E, Seattle, WA 98102

6:00pm

Ghost Song
It's time to listen to the ghosts. You're invited to join Anis Gisele, Sara Brickman, Troy Osaki and Shelby Handler as they speak to the ghosts that brought them here. These poets will offer work on ancestry and the blood that keeps surviving.

Featured Artists:

Anis Gisele is a poet, a survivor, a riot, and a believer of anger and disobedience as an Azn femme. They are the recipient of fellowships and awards from VONA/Voices, Everyday Feminism, King County's Equity and Social Justice Initiative, 4Culture, Artist Trust, Hugo House, Jack Straw Cultural Center, and other institutions, both marvelous and complicated. They come from Manila, Philippines and from so many women who were told to be quiet.

Sara Brickman is a Jewish and gender-queer writer, performer, and community organizer from Ann Arbor, MI. The winner of the 2015 Split This Rock Poetry Prize, and a five-time member of Seattle slam teams, Sara has received grants and scholarships from the Lambda Literary Foundation, The Yiddish Book Center, 4Culture, and more. A BOAAT Writers Fellow and a Ken Warfel Fellow for Poetry in Community, Sara’s poems and prose appear in Narrative, Adriot, BOAAT, Indiana Review, Muzzle, and the anthologies Ghosts of Seattle Past, The Dead Animal Handbook and Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls. Sara holds an MFA from the University of Virginia and lives in Seattle, where they teach writing to youth and adults, and parent a cat named Latke.

Troy Osaki is a Filipino Japanese poet, community organizer, and attorney from Seattle, WA. He’s a Kundiman fellow and a three-time Seattle poetry grand slam champion. His work has appeared in the Bellingham Review, Drunk in a Midnight Choir, Moss: A Journal of the Pacific Northwest, and elsewhere. He writes in hopes to build a safe and just place to live in by uniting the people and reimagining the world through poetry.

Shelby Handler is a queer Jewish writer and organizer living on Duwamish territory/Seattle, WA. A 2019-20 Hugo House Fellow, Shelby’s work has also received support from the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Asylum Arts, the Yiddish Book Center, Artist Trust, Gay City Arts and Winter Tangerine. Their work has appeared in Gigantic Sequins, glitterMOB and the Write Bloody anthology “We Will Be Shelter: Poems for Survival”, among others.



Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Hotel Sorrento 900 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104

6:00pm

Margin Shift: Friends in Poetry
Margin Shift: Friends in Poetry is a Seattle based poetry collective and monthly reading series that’s constantly shifting. We highlight poets of color, LGBTQI poets, poets from out of town, poets who are new to town, women poets, undoc- umented poets, experimental writers, and brand new writers. Always changing, always shifting, always something different.

Featured Artists

Nadine Antoinette Maestas is a poet's poet and believes that the empire of the sentence is an extremely oppressive totalitarian regime. She prefers the company of poems so much that she would rather read a bad poem than a good novel, but when she is not doing poetry, Nadine loves mountain biking and trail running in dangerous and remote places in the Northwest. She teaches Creative Writing and Literature in San Francisco and New Hampshire, has facilitated writing workshops through Youthspeaks and has helped to pioneer poetry workshops in several public schools in California and Michigan. Nadine holds an M.F.A. from University of Michigan’s Hellen Zell Writer’s Program where she was awarded the Faraar award for playwriting. Her hybrid poem play “Hellen on Wheels: a Play of Rhyme and Reason” was performed at California College of the Arts. She is the co-author with Karen Weiser of “Beneath the Bright Discus” (Potes & Poets Press, 2000), and is a co-editor for the poetry anthology Make It True: Poetry from Cascadia. You can find her poems published in Pageboy Magazine, Lyric &, The Germ, and Poor Mojo’s Almana(k). Her dissertation, Calling out the State: Postmodern American Anthropoetics landed her a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

Eddie Kim received his MFA in Poetry from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He is a Kundiman fellow from Seattle who served as the inaugural Pacific Northwest Kundiman Regional Chair. His poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, The Margins, The Collagist, Pinwheel, Narrative Magazine, and others.

Woogee Bae is a poet and editor whose work focuses on translingual poetics and waste. She received her MFA from the University of Washington Bothell, edits the ecopoetics journal Snail Trail, and curates the quarterly reading series Gamut. Her writing can be found in P-QUEUE, Small Po[r]tions, Poetry Northwest (forthcoming), and elsewhere. She lives in Seattle.

Hosted by: Deborah Woodard and Matt Trease


Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Unicorn 1118 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Playing With Dough
Three authors write about, among other things, the time they spend playing with dough. For veteran cookbook author and teacher Cynthia Lair, it’s about digging into the wonders and mysteries of sourdough. The lively and talented Linda Miller Nicholson creates rainbow-colored pasta that looks (almost) too good to eat. Finally, blogger and author Aran Goyoaga crafts beautiful indulgences that are gluten-free. Each will talk briefly about how they arrived at their specialty and share some samples from their books, as well as their words. Hosted by undoubtable Jeanne Sauvage.




Tickets are $5
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4414454




Featured Artists

Linda Miller Nicholson is an internationally-recognized pasta powerhouse. She has been featured on The Today Show, O Magazine, The Food Network, Saveur, Good Housekeeping, Buzzfeed, Elle, the BBC, and Business Insider, to name a few. She has made pasta art for Katy Perry, Camila and Matthew McConaughey, Snooki, and the cast of The Chew, and with Harry Connick Jr. She’s been the subject of several documentaries, has a popular cookbook called Pasta, Pretty Please, and regularly appears on national and international tv. Linda also teaches frequent workshops from her custom pasta studio near Seattle- join her!


ARAN GOYOAGA is a cookbook author, blogger, food stylist, and photographer. Aran was born and raised in the Basque Country, in northern Spain, where her maternal grandparents owned a pastry shop and her paternal grandparents live off the land. Her blog, Cannelle et Vanille, is a two-time James Beard Award finalist. Her first book, Small Plates & Sweet Treats, was named one of the top cookbooks of 2012 by Sara Moulton on “Good Morning America.” Aran's world-renowned Instagram account has 278,000 followers and is a world-renowned culinary account. Her latest book, Cannelle et Vanille launched in September (Sasquatch). cannellevanille.com

Jeanne Sauvage is the author of two cookbooks, Gluten-Free Wish List: Sweet and Savory Treats You’ve Missed the Most, and Gluten-Free Baking for the Holidays: 60 Recipes for Traditional Festive Treats. Gluten-free herself, she is the voice behind the popular blog, Art of Gluten-Free Baking, where she shares recipes, baking tips, and information to help others bake gluten-free treats that are indistinguishable from their wheat counterparts. Artofglutenfreebaking.com



Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Elliott Bay Book Company 1521 10th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Readings on "No", Rape, & Calculation
"There are millions of reasons to murder but no reason to rape." What does consent mean? What does "No" mean? If and when they have heretofore meant the same thing, how do we claw back into our own skin? Join two poets from Berkeley for a reading on "No", rape, and calculation.

Featured Artists:

Jongmin Jerome Baek is a genderqueer Korean-American writer, traveler, and engineer who studied writing at Seoul, Indiana, New Jersey, West Georgia, Berkeley, and Seattle. They would like to settle down. They wrote the indie game 6180 the moon, where the moon sets out to find the missing sun. Jerome taught philosophy of computer science at Berkeley and once at UW, and is the author of "The Poetry of Computer Science, the Computer Science of Poetry". Their poems appear in The Eclectic, Glass Mountain, and their website, jjbaek.com.

Emmanuelle Gauthier is a franco-yukoner poet, writer and wanderer. She studied psychology in Montreal, creative writing in Berkeley and the yoga sutras in Mysore, India. Many years of roaming in North America, inspired her to write about humanity’s desperate yet beautiful attempts to love. Her French poems and essays can be read in all the editions of the magazine À la Dégrise. She is the author of the collection of poems Racoon Tales and she is currently on tour to read samples of her soon to be published novel Comment conduire manuel et guérir son herpes, ( How to drive standard and cure your herpes). Emmanuelle doesn’t have wifi in her cabin in Yukon but the easiest way to follow her work is through her Facebook, Pierrot La Lune.



Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Office Nomads 1617 Boylston Ave #200, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

The Poet Salon
The Poet Salon is a podcast where poets talk over drinks. In each episode, cohosts Gabrielle Bates, Luther Hughes, and Dujie Tahat answer a question from the audience and then interview a poet they love about some of the issues, challenges, and delights of being a poet today. Recent guests include Hanif Abdurraqib, Lena Khalaf Tuffaha, Ross Gay, and Danez Smith. You can listen wherever you get podcasts, and check them out online at https://www.thepoetsalon.com / on Twitter at @PoetSalonPod.

Featured Artists

Luther Hughes is a Seattle native and author of Touched (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2018). He is the Founding Editor of The Shade Journal, Executive Editor for the The Offing, Editor at Frontier Poetry, and Twitter Editor for YesYes Books. Along with Gabrielle Bates and Dujie Tahat, he cohosts The Poet Salon podcast. His writing has been published or is forthcoming in Poetry, The Seattle Times, New England Review, The Rumpus, and others. Luther received his MFA from Washington University in St. Louis. You can follow him on Twitter @lutherxhughes. He thinks you are beautiful.

Dujie Tahat is a Filipino-Jordanian immigrant living in Washington state. His poems have been published or are forthcoming in Sugar House Review, The Journal, The Southeast Review, Narrative, Bennington Review, Poetry Northwest, Asian American Literary Review, and elsewhere. Dujie has earned fellowships from Hugo House, Jack Straw Writing Program, and the Poetry Foundation, as well as a work-study scholarship from Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. He serves as a poetry editor for Moss and Homology Lit and cohosts The Poet Salon podcast.


Gabrielle Bates is a writer and visual artist from Birmingham, Alabama. Her poems appear or are forthcoming in the New Yorker, Poetry, New England Review, jubilat, Gulf Coast, Black Warrior Review, the Best of the Net anthology, and BAX: Best American Experimental Writing, and her poetry comics have been featured internationally in a variety of exhibitions, festivals, and conferences. Formerly the managing editor of the Seattle Review and a contributing editor for Poetry Northwest, Gabrielle currently serves as the Social Media Manager of Open Books: A Poem Emporium, the official voice of Broadsided Press on twitter, a contributing editor for Bull City Press, and a 2019 Jack Straw fellow. With Luther Hughes and Dujie Tahat, she cohosts the podcast The Poet Salon. You can find her on Twitter (@GabrielleBates), Instagram (@gabrielle_bates_), and online at www.gabriellebat.es. "


Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Northwest Film Forum 1515 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

I've Got Friends in Queer Places
There is complexity inherent in loving a place and being in a body. These queer writers wander, fixate, observe, nurture, activate, invent, and inhale place in their writing. All roads lead to hybridity, where these writers explore belonging, environment, and connection across geographic, emotional, and cultural landscapes. This reading seeks a space where there is room for our whole selves.

Featured Artists

Jordan Alam is a writer, performer, and therapist in training who is currently working on a debut novel that engages with moments of rupture in the lives of one Bangladeshi American family. They have published and performed widely, including most recently as a Town Hall Seattle Inside/Out resident. Lately, they've been thinking about ambiguous loss and how to keep houseplants alive during winter.

Meredith Arena is a queer writer from New York City, where she spent most of her life. She moved to Seattle in 2011 and learned how to drive in 2015. She is an interdisciplinary teaching artist working in public schools. Meredith participated in the 2019 Winter Tangerine writing workshop, Orchids Without Attached Things. She served on the journal Lunch Ticket for four semesters, ultimately as the Blog Editor. Her work can be found in Paragon Press: Echo, Entropy, SHIFT Queer Literary Arts Journal, Lunch Ticket, The Interdependence Project Blog, Lion’s Roar and upcoming in Silver Needle Press. She holds an MFA in creative writing and a Certificate in the Teaching of Creative Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles.

Meredith Clark is a poet and writer whose work has received Black Warrior Review's nonfiction prize. Her poetry has been published or is forthcoming in the Dusie Kollektiv, Phoebe, Gigantic Sequins, Berkeley Poetry Review, and Poetry Northwest. These days she writes about trees, bodies, time, and the uncategorizable. Her first book, Lyrebird, is forthcoming from Platypus Press in 2020.

Molly Thornton is a Los Angeles based writer and writing coach who works with writers at every stage of their creative process. She is a Lambda Literary Emerging Writers Fellow, and her poetry, essays, and fiction appear in publications including The Lavender Review, baldhip magazine, The Leveller, The Seattle Globalist, and They Said anthology from Black Lawrence Press.

Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 6:45pm
Ollie Quinn 910 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

6:00pm

Lit Crawl Seattle 2019: Spooky in Seattle
What It’s All About:
For one night only, Lit Crawl takes over Capitol Hill for Seattle’s biggest and booziest literary party. A pub crawl featuring readings, performances and even cooking demonstrations, Lit Crawl is your interactive guide to Seattle’s vast, crazy, and loving literary scene.

This year promises a wide range of shows from traditional readings to theatrical performances, cooking performances, and panels. Not just for adults, youth-friendly readings are available to highlight our exciting new talent. Finally, join your fellow crawlers for the after party at Hugo House (starting at 10 p.m.). There you can buy a book from your favorite author, pick up some last-minute swag and send off Lit Crawl 2019 with one last toast.

According to Managing Director, Jekeva Philips: “This year's crawl is richer and spookier than ever.”

Date: October 24th
Time: 6 p.m. to midnight
Where: Capitol Hill Neighborhood




Thursday October 24, 2019 6:00pm - 11:30pm

7:00pm

African American Writers Alliance featuring Georgia McDade
Georgia Stewart McDade, a Louisiana native who has lived in Seattle more than half her life, loves reading and writing.  As a youngster she wrote and produced plays for her siblings and neighbors and collaborated with church youth to write plays for special occasions.  Earning a Bachelor of Arts from Southern University, Master of Arts from Atlanta University, and Ph. D. from University of Washington, the English major spent more than thirty years teaching at Tacoma Community College but also found time to teach at Seattle University, the University of Washington, Lakeside School, Renton Technical College, and Zion Preparatory Academy.  As a charter member of the African-American Writers’ Alliance (AAWA), McDade began reading her stories in public in 1991.  She credits AAWA with making her regularly write poetry.  For a number of years she has written poems inspired by art at such sites as Gallery 110, Seattle Art Museum, and Columbia City Gallery.  She wrote for Pacific Newspapers, especially the South District Journal.  Convinced all of us can learn to write well, McDade conducts and participates in a variety of writing workshops.  “Good writing can force us to think and think critically; we can theorize, organize, analyze, and synthesize better,” says she.  A prolific writer, she has works in AAWA anthologies I Wonder as I Wander, Gifted Voices, Words? Words! Words, and Threads.   Her works include Travel Tips for Dream Trips, questions and answers about her six-month, solo trip around the world; Outside the Cave, a collection of poetry; and numerous essays, stories, and poems.  This year a second collection of poems and a collection of stories and essays will be published.  She volunteers at community radio station KBCS (91.3 FM) and Boys and Girls Club.  Among her several writing projects are the biography of her high school principal and journals kept during her  

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Vermillion Art Gallery & Bar 1508 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

Apocalypses Now

It has been nearly 20 years since Y2K consumed the world. Fear of the End of Days united survivalists, religious zealots, and anxious computer programmers alike. Let's party like it's 1999 with three fantastical fiction writers whose work spans genres and styles. Ruth Joffre, Jennie Melamed, and Alexandra Oliva will each share short fiction featuring their takes on apocalypses, be they global or personal.

Featured Artists:

Ruth Joffre is the author of the short story collection Night Beast. Her fiction and poetry have appeared or are forthcoming in Kenyon Review, Gulf Coast, Pleiades, Prairie Schooner, The Masters Review, Lightspeed, Mid-American Review, and elsewhere. Her months-long interview series with the authors, editors, and curators of craft books, essays, and resources is now running on the Kenyon Review blog. A graduate of Cornell University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Ruth lives in Seattle and teaches at the Hugo House.

Originally from a rural mountain town in upstate New York, Alexandra Oliva moved to the Pacific Northwest in 2014. She is first-generation college educated, holding a B.A. from Yale University and an M.F.A. from The New School. Her debut novel, The Last One, was selected as a Seattle Times Best Book of 2016, and she is currently putting the finishing touches on her second novel. She lives in Woodinville with her husband, dog, and toddler son.

Jennie Melamed's debut novel GATHER THE DAUGHTERS (Little, Brown, 2017) was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award and longlisted for the Dublin International Literary Award, as well as named a Best Book of the Year by The Guardian and Booklist. Her writing has appeared in Joyland Magazine, Teen Vogue, Lithub, and other venies. She lives in Seattle, where she works as a psychiatric nurse practitioner.

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Bauhaus 515 Harvard Ave East #121 Seattle, WA 98102

7:00pm

Bodies of Science
Two memoir writers share the most personally transformative experiences of their life. For Angela Garbes, it was pregnancy. When the food and culture writer received conflicting and vague answers to what she thought were simple questions about the reproductive process, she did a deep dive into the science behind it. Deidre Timmons was diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain tumor just as her mother was descending deep in Alzheimer’s and her husband was venturing into the restaurant business. Both reveal their experiences with humor, objectivity and refreshing honesty. Host by Abigail Carter.

Featured Artists

Angela Garbes is the author of Like a Mother, her 2018 narrative nonfiction book exploring the emerging science and cultural myths of pregnancy. The book was named a Best Book of the Year by NPR and she was featured on “Fresh Air” with Terry Gross. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, New York Magazine’s The Cut and in a previous life, she was the staff food writer at The Stranger. Her next project is a book of reported essays about bodies.

Deirdre Timmons is a writer and filmmaker who penned Brain Candy, a memoir about her experience of living through treatment for an inoperable brain tumor while caring for her mother dying of Alzheimer’s. Her films include the 2008 documentary, “A Wink and a Smile” about Seattle’s neo-burlesque movement. She is work on a follow-up book on how her mother put her on endless diets as a child, an experience that haunted her notion about weight and self image well into adulthood.

Abigail Carter was a Canadian expat living in New Jersey when her husband died in the Sept. 11th attacks. Stunned and grieving, she moved to Seattle with her two young children. What started as a form of catharsis became a memoir, The Alchemy of Loss: A Young Widow's Transformation. The book was named one of the 100 most Notable Books of 2008 by The Globe and Mail and long listed for Canada’s largest Non-Fiction prize. Her latest work is a novel, Remember the Moon. Her work has appeared in SELF magazine, Reader's Digest Canada, MSN.com, Huffington Post, and MORE.com. abigailcarter.com

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Ada's Technical Books & Cafe 425 15th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

7:00pm

Fuhrman. Judd. Roberts
How do bodies, colors, and held beliefs negotiate desire? Does it all eventually go bump in the night? Join three poets of color for a powerful reading that promises to haunt, challenge and illuminate notions of heart.

Featured Artists

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems (Floodgate 2020) and co-editor of Native Voices (Tupelo 2019). She has published poetry and nonfiction in multiple journals including High Desert Journal, Yellow Medicine Review, Cutthroat a Journal of the Arts, Whitefish Review, Broadsided Press, Taos Journal of Poetry and Art, as well as several anthologies.  CMarie is the 2019 recipient of the Grace Paley Fellowship at Under the Volcano in Tepotzlán, Mexico, a 2019 graduate of the University of Idaho's MFA program, regular columnist for the Inlander, and an editorial team member for Broadsided Press and Transmotion.  CMarie resides in the mountains of West Central Idaho.  

Bettina Judd is an interdisciplinary writer, artist, and performer whose research focus is on Black women's creative production and our use of visual art, literature, and music to develop Black feminist thought. Her collection of poems on the history of medical experimentation on Black women titledPatient. won the 2013 Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize. She is currently Assistant Professor of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Mg Roberts is a teacher, poet and multimedia artist. She is the author of the poetry collection not so, sea (Durga Press, 2014) and Anemal Uter Meck (Black Radish Books, 2017). Her poems can be found in Dusie, Web Conjunctions, the Sierra Nevada Review, and elsewhere. She’s a Kundiman Fellow, Kelsey Street Press member, and serves on the board of directors for Small Press Traffic, a San Francisco–based literary arts organization. She’s currently co-editing an anthology on the urgency of experimental writing written for and by writers of color.

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Sole Repair 1001 E Pike St Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

Haunted by Heartbreak
Heartbreak. It's unavoidable. An expectation shattered. A sudden turn. A gradual reckoning. Whether over a person, an opportunity, or a dream, we've all been haunted by longing and loss. Come join 4 kick-ass local womxn writers and non-binary writers as they explore the bruised, blushed terrain of their heart's desire.

Featured Artists

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer disabled nonbinary femme writer, disability and transformative justice movement worker, and educator of Burgher/Tamil Sri Lankan and Irish/Roma ascent. The Lambda Award winning author of Tonguebreaker, Bridge of Flowers, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice, Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home, Bodymap, Love Cake and Consensual Genocide, with Ching-In Chen and Jai Dulani, she co-edited The Revolution Starts At Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Activist Communities.  Beyond Survival: Stories and Strategies From the Transformative Justice Movement, co-edited with Ejeris Dixon, is forthcoming from AK Press in spring 2020. Since 2009,  she has been a lead artist with the disability justice performance collective Sins Invalid.

The co-founder of QTPOC performance collective Mangos With Chili and Toronto’s Asian Arts Freedom School, they are a VONA Fellow and hold an MFA from Mills College. She is also a rust belt poet, a Sri Lankan with a white mom, a femme over 40, a grassroots intellectual, a survivor who is hard to kill.


Keetje Kuipers’ third collection, All Its Charms, was published by BOA Editions in 2019. Her poems have appeared widely, including in The New York Times Magazine, as well as the Pushcart Prize and Best American Poetry anthologies. Previously a Wallace Stegner fellow, Bread Loaf fellow, and the Margery Davis Boyden Wilderness Writing Resident, Kuipers is currently Senior Editor at Poetry Northwest.

Anne Liu Kellor is a multiracial Chinese American writer, teacher, editor, and coach. Her essays have appeared or are forthcoming in publications such as Longreads, The New England Review, The Normal School, Fourth Genre, Vela Magazine, and Literary Mama, and her manuscript, HEART RADICAL, was selected by Cheryl Strayed as 1st runner-up in Kore Press’s 2018 memoir contest. She has received fellowships from Hedgebrook, Hypatia-in-the-Woods, 4Culture, and Jack Straw.

Jessica Mooney is a former Hugo House fellow whose writing has appeared in Entropy, Moss, City Arts Magazine, Salon, the Rumpus and elsewhere. Her chapbook Parting Gifts for Losing Contestants, a collection of essays, is forthcoming from COAST|noCOAST in October. She is grateful to have received grant awards from Artist Trust, the Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, and 4 Culture. 










Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Ollie Quinn 910 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

Hedgebrook Reading: Strangers in a Strange Land
She sliced like a knife through everything; at the same time was outside looking in. She had a perpetual sense, as she watched the taxi cabs, of being out, out, far out to sea and alone; she always had the feeling that it was very, very dangerous to live even one day,” wrote Virginia Woolf. Three relatively well-adjusted Hedgebrook alum share stories of not quite fitting in.




Featured Artists:




Cartoonist Ellen Forney is the author of bestselling graphic memoir, Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me and Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life(forthcoming from Fantagraphics Books in Spring, 2018). She collaborated on the National Book Award-winning novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian,and was awarded residency fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Civitella Ranieri.She curated “Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived & Well-Drawn”, a traveling exhibition about comics and health for the National Library of Medicine, and as a visual artist, she was selected to create two permanent large-scale murals for Seattle’s Capitol Hill light rail station. She grew up in Philadelphia and lives in Seattle, and teaches comics at Cornish College of the Arts.







Kathleen Alcala is the author of six fiction and nonfiction books, and honored with many awards including the Western States Book Award and the Governor’s Writers Award. Kathleen is working on a new novel, and her first, Spirits of the Ordinary, will be republished in 2020.




Wendy Call is co-editor of the craft anthology Telling True Stories (Penguin, 2007), author of the award-winning nonfiction book No Word for Welcome (Nebraska, 2011), and translator of In the Belly of Night and Other Poems by Irma Pineda (Pluralia, 2020). She is currently a Seattle CityArtist and Fulbright Scholar in Colombia. 


Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Capitol Cider 818 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

House of Ink
House of Ink is an improvised murder mystery about six famous authors, trapped in a house overnight, slowly realizing that one of them is a murderer. You, the audience will choose a seventh author to be the first victim, and one well-read audience member will choose the murderer! House of Ink is directed by Tony Beeman and was created at Seattle's own Unexpected Productions.

Tickets are $5
Link:   https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4420774 

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Hugo House 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

New Weird Tales
As a genre, what is Weird with a capital "W?" Haunting. Cosmic. Existential. Evan J. Peterson, Elly Bangs, and Oscar McNary chart the Weird territories of the imagination through original fiction with a queer spin--in every sense of the word. “No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream.” ― Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Featured Artists

Elly Bangs was raised in a new-age cult, had six wisdom teeth, and once rode her bicycle alone from Seattle to the Panama Canal. Now she lives in Seattle, where she spends her days fixing machines and her nights screwing around with words. Her short fiction has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Clarkesworld, Galaxy's Edge, and Strange Horizons, and her post-apocalyptic cyberpunk novel is on its way from Tachyon Publications. She is a proud Dreamcrasher and graduate of Clarion West 2017. You can read more of her work at elbangs.com


Evan J. Peterson is the author of Drag Star! (Choice of Games), the world’s first drag RPG, as well as The PrEP Diaries: A Safe(r) Sex Memoir (Lethe Press). He is a Clarion West alum and author of the horror poetry chapbooks Skin Job andThe Midnight Channel as well as editor of the Lambda Literary finalist Ghosts in Gaslight, Monsters in Steam: Gay City 5. His writing has appeared in Weird Tales, Unspeakable Horror 2, Queers Destroy Horror, Boing Boing, and Best Gay Stories 2015. He cohosts and coproduces WONDER: Women of Fantasy and Science Fiction in Seattle.Evanjpeterson.com can tell you more.


Oscar McNary writes weird stories in Seattle. His work has appeared in Two Hour Transport Anthology 2019; the Lambda Literary Award Finalist anthology Ghosts in Gaslight, Monsters in Steam: Gay City Anthology V; Discovery: QSF's Second Annual Flash Fiction Contest; and Eunoia Review. Oscar's poems are collected in three chapbooks. He facilitated the all-trans writing group, Trans Writes! 2010-2011. He co-created the short film, "Robin Hood is So Gay," which screened at the Seattle, Los Angeles, and San Francisco trans film festivals in 2011-2012. He is a proud Dreamcrasher. You can follow his work at oscarmcnary.wordpress.com.


Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Hotel Sorrento 900 Madison St, Seattle, WA 98104

7:00pm

Something Fishy
Two award-winning food writers, two very different books about fish. Naomi Tomky’s will share some behind-the-kitchen-door insight into putting together her debut, The Pacific Northwest Seafood Cookbook. Best-selling author, Kathleen Flinn, will discuss how she ended up publishing Sakana Lesson, a book about Tokyo’s shifting fish culture in Japanese, even though she doesn’t speak a word of the language. Both will share tastes from their books. Hosted by seafood expert and prolific cookbook author, Cynthia Nims.

Featured Artist

Naomi Tomky writes about food and travel for publications including Saveur, Travel + Leisure, and Food & Wine, along with contributing to various guidebooks and cookbooks. She won the Association of Food Journalists “Best Food and Travel Writing” award for 2016 and was included in the 2017 edition of the Best Food Writing anthology. Her first solo cookbook, The Pacific Northwest Seafood Cookbook, will be published in November 2019.

Kathleen Flinn is an internationally best-selling author best known for The New York Times best-selling memoir, The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry. Her acclaimed follow-up, The Kitchen Counter Cooking School, was named a 2012 Book of the Year by the American Society of Journalists & Authors (ASJA). The Japanese adaptation of that book, imaginatively titled Miracle Cooking Lessons for Bad Women, became a sensation in Japan when it debuted in early 2017. Sakana Lesson, written specifically for the Japanese market, hit shelves in June 2019. An English version will be published in the U.S. in 2020. Kathleenflinn.com

Tickets are $5
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4414461

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Elliott Bay Book Company 1521 10th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

The Haunting
What do we do about that which lingers in absentia? When we mourn our icons, when a piece of wasted fruit haunts us, when the unspoken lays heavy on our tongues; Jen Soriano, Elaina Ellis, and Amber Flame explore what our ghosts are made of - grief, revenge, desire, redemption and more.  

Featured Artists

Amber Flame is an award-winning writer, performer, composer, activist and educator who works extensively with both youth and adults. Amber Flame’s work has garnered artistic merit residencies with Hedgebrook, The Watering Hole, Vermont Studio Center, and Yefe Nof. Flame’s writing has been published in diverse arenas, including Winter Tangerine, Nailed Magazine, City Arts Magazine, Mom Egg Review, The Dialogist, Split This Rock, Black Heart Magazine, Sundress Publications, FreezeRay, Redivider Journal and more. A 2016 & 2017 Pushcart Prize nominee, Jack Straw Writer Program, Artist Support Program, and New Media Gallerist, Flame was also a recipient of the CityArtist grant from Seattle's Office of Arts and Cultural Affairs. Amber Flame's first full-length poetry collection, Ordinary Cruelty, was published through Write Bloody Press in 2017. Flame served as the 2017-2019 poetry Writer-in-Residence for Hugo House in Seattle, and is a queer Black single mama just one magic trick away from growing her unicorn horn.

Elaina Ellis is the author of the poetry book WRITE ABOUT AN EMPTY BIRDCAGE (Write Bloody Publishing) and the recipient of a Lambda Literary Emerging Writers Fellowship, Tent Creative Writing Fellowship, June Dodge Poetry Fellowship from Mineral School, and ArtistTrust GAP Award. She is at work on a second collection, I'M ONLY PRAYING TO BELIEVE WHAT'S TRUE, which responds to the heat and horrors of the biblical Book of Ezekiel. She earned her MFA at Antioch University Los Angeles, and lives in Bellingham, Washington. She works as an editor at Copper Canyon Press.

Jen Soriano (she:they) is a Filipinx-American writer and musician originally from the Chicago area. She writes lyric essays and performance poetry about the intersections of trauma, health, science, politics, colonization, nature and power. Jen won the 2019 Fugue Prose Prize and the 2019 Penelope Niven Prize, and is an upcoming Jack Jones Yi Dae Up Fellow and Hugo House Fellow. They received their MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop under the mentorship of Julie Marie Wade, Kent Meyers, Rick Barot and Barrie Jean Borich. Jen’s chapbook "Making the Tongue Dry" is forthcoming from The Platform Review Chapbook Series of Arts by the People.


Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Barca 1510 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

7:00pm

Where The House Was in Conversation
It seems so fitting that on the cusp of Halloween, the ghost of old Hugo House shall come upon us. In this event, Cali Kopczick, one of the many amazing people behind Where the House Was,  resurrects our beloved old house on the silver screen. Join her as she shows clips from the film and fields any questions about the making of this seminal Seattle work.  

Guest speakers include:
Cali Kopczick is a writer and editor based in Seattle, Washington. She was the editor for Chin Music Press and is the production manager and story editor of the documentary Where the House Was. Her writing is out or forthcoming with The Offing, The Birds We Piled Loosely, Bone Bouquet, and Crab Creek Review, among others.

Ryan Adams is the director of Where the House Was. Unlike the singer you might be thinking of, this Ryan K. Adams has been making films for 31 years. He studied classic experimental cinema at the Evergreen State College. Adams’s collaborations with experimental filmmaker Jon Behrens, distributed by Canyon Cinema, are shown worldwide. As a cinematographer, Ryan has shot several feature-length films, including The Oregonian (Sundance ’11) which is currently distributed by Sundance and is available via iTunes, and William Never Married, which won Best Cinematography at the 2010 Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles. His collaborations with Seattle-based artist Susie Lee on a series of video portraits called Still Lives have been shown worldwide. Ryan created the video backdrops used in The Fisher Ensemble’s performance of Kocho at Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, NY, in 2011. In 2012, he shot the documentary Massacred for Gold, directed by Vernon Lott. In addition to his personal work, Ryan also directs music videos, industrials, political ads, and short films.

Thursday October 24, 2019 7:00pm - 7:45pm
Northwest Film Forum 1515 12th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Covens, Cards and Connections: A Reading and Conversation
Featured Artists

Imani Sims is an alchemist and author from Seattle. As Executive Director for RADAR Productions, in San Francisco, she continues to elevate the narratives of QTPOC folk all over the nation. Her work illuminates the death and life living within the black femme.

afrose fatima ahmed is a Texan-Washingtonian poet. she is the author of four chapbooks & a full length collection of oracle poems entitled "blood gold and honey." she has been a Jack Straw writer & recipient of an Artist Trust GAP grant.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Barca 1510 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Alchemy Reading
Alchemy is a curated performance art space that elevates voices that are often silenced.  Poets share their brilliance by offering personal stories and reflections that are socially relevant.  We are powerful artists and our space allows our audience to witness the craft at its highest form. We believe that art is a divine power to create community. Follow us on Instagram at @alchemypoetryseries. At our Special Edition at LitCrawl, we’ve invited some powerful poets: Ben Yisrael, Chelsey Richardson and Jessica Rycheal to offer their stories. Hosted by Ebo Barton.


Featured Artists

Ebo Barton is a Black and Filipino, Transgender and Non-Binary, poet and educator. Barton’s career began with competing in poetry slam. Their most notable poetry slam accolade is placing 5th in the world in 2016. They and their work have been featured in Seattle Times, Seattle Weekly, Seattle Gay News, Seattle Review of Books, and Crosscut. Their work touches on political issues from a personal point of view and often is birthed from the struggles of living in the identities that they are. Ebo believes in the power of language and art as a tool for revolution.

Jessica Rycheal is an interdiscplinary storyteller and Art Director from Macon, Georgia. She's carved space for herself in the pacific northwest with a career commercial design strategy, and her debut photography exhibition “EVERYDAY BLACK” at the Northwest African-American Museum. However, her healing journey and a few intuitive guides led Rycheal back to her first love, writing. In this medium, Rycheal explores themes of self-healing, generational trauma, and self-love. Though the disciplines in which Jessica Rycheal works vary, the common thread unifying her diverse mediums of expression is story-telling. Her passion for story-telling is rooted in a love for her people and advocacy for holistic black liberation. It is this love and passion that yield the emotive, impactful and relatable body of work for which Rycheal is known. This October, Jessica Rycheal will be featured in a group exhibition called “Face First” at Bainbridge Island Museum of Art.

Ben Yisrael is a performance poet, storyteller, and writer. Yisrael has participated in the performance poetry community since 2005. He has been a member of 10 National Poetry Slam (NPS) teams. He is a NPS team finalist and a 2-time NPS semi-finalist. Some of his performance accomplishments include being the 2010 Dallas Poetry Grind Slam Champion, the 2012 Individual World Poetry Slam 17th ranked poet in the world, the 2014 NPS Haiku Champion, and the 2017 Seattle Poetry Slam Grand Slam Champion. He is the co-founder of Mic Check, one of the longest running poetry readings in Texas, and is a curator at Alchemy Poetry Series in Seattle WA.

Chelsey Richardson is an experimental dreamer-poet. The CD Forum said this about her, “Her writing requires you to think critically and examine the world in which we live. She is a writer that truly represents independent poetic expression. There is a cleverness and creativity in her prose that draws the reader or listener in. She is an amazing teaching artist and mentor in Seattle who is poised for a dynamic career.” She prefers to weave together the most uncommon and the most disliked stories about people, places and things. She is the creator of, “Black Unicorn”- an IG story that represents black people and the normalcy of living.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Ada's Technical Books & Cafe 425 15th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

8:00pm

Failing Gracefully with Friends
Join us for a powerhouse of poets. Kilam Tel Aviv (12th Man: Echoes of the Forgotten Race) is out with a new chapbook, Failing Gracefully, which explores the most human experience of them all: failure.  Kilam will read some new poems for you alongside Jamaar Smiley and Aviona Rodriguez Brown. Prepare yourself.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Capitol Cider 818 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Jack Straw Prose Reading
All writing that matters to me nudges at the unknown, takes chances,” writes 2019 Jack Straw Writers Program Curator Kathleen Flenniken in the 2019 Jack Straw Writers Anthology. “Reading it is an act of discovery, which can be uncomfortable, upsetting, touching, revelatory.” Kathleen will host, introducing some of the 2019 Jack Straw Writers and their uncomfortable, upsetting, touching, revelatory work.

Featured Artists

Dianne Aprile is the author and editor of nonfiction books, including three book collaborations with visual artists and three gallery collaborations. She teaches Creative Nonfiction on the MFA faculty at Spalding University’s School of Creative and Professional Writing. Her current project is a family memoir, from which two excerpts have been nominated for Pushcart prizes. She can be heard reading her essay “Silence” at NPR’s This I Believe website, and she has an essay forthcoming in the Boom Project Anthology (Summer 2019). Her poems have appeared in journals, most recently The Raven Chronicles. Aprile received fellowships from Kentucky Arts Council and Artist Trust; grants from Kentucky Foundation for Women; a Hedgebrook Women Writers Residency and, as a journalist, she was part of a team at theLouisville Courier Journal that won a staff Pulitzer Prize.

Josh Axelrad is a writer and performer from Seattle via New York via L.A. via Hays, Kansas. His memoir,Repeat Until Rich, was published by Penguin Press. A regular at The Moth, he’s hosted StorySlams, appeared on stage nationwide, and been featured on The Moth Radio Hour.

Suzanne Warren is a fiction writer and essayist whose work appears or is forthcoming in Narrative, Gulf Coast, The Cincinnati Review, Memorious, The Prague Revue, Versal, and Post Road, which selected her story “The Raspberry King” to appear in its Guest Folio. Her story “The Country of Husbands” won an Editor’s Reprint Award from Sequestrum. Other writing awards include residencies at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and the Ucross Foundation. Warren lives in Seattle and is currently at work on her first book, a collection of short stories titled The Country of Husbands.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Ollie Quinn 910 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Late Night Tales at the Library
After the library closes at night, the ghastly shades deceased librarians have been known to roam the stacks shushing the unwary and gathering up any overdue souls. Come gather round our late night library and get in the Hallowe’en spirit at our fifth annual spooky storytime, for adults and older kids. The library will close at 8 p.m., and a few minutes later re-open for intrepid spirits ready for our literary séance.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Capitol Hill Branch - Seattle Public Library 425 Harvard Ave E, Seattle, WA 98102

8:00pm

Let's Talk About Death Over Drinks
Conversations about death ultimately wind up exploring how we want to live. In this interactive session, Michael Hebb, the charismatic author of Let’s Talk about Death over Dinner, will guide the audience through engaging, thoughtful conversation exercises for revealing results. The goal: to encourage those who take part to no longer see life’s most important conversation as taboo. (Light snack)

Featured Artist

Michael Hebb is the founder of Death Over Dinner, a Partner at global wellbeing organization RoundGlass and the founder of Convivium, a creative agency that specializes in the ability to shift culture through the use of thoughtful food and discourse-based gatherings. Convivium has worked closely with thought/cultural leaders and many foundations/institutions including: The World Economic Forum, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Clinton Global Initiative, X Prize Foundation, FEED Foundation, TED, TEDMED, Apple, United Nations Foundation and The Nature Conservancy. His work has appeared in GQ, Food and Wine, Food Arts, ARCADE, Seattle Magazine and City Arts.

Tickets are $5
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4414468




Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Bauhaus 515 Harvard Ave East #121 Seattle, WA 98102

8:00pm

LIT Lit
The name is dumb (we know) but come join us anyway as four writers of color fire up the Pacific Northwest with prose, poetry and (possibly) music. Featuring Quenton Baker, Santi Holley, Shayla Lawson and Jane Wong.


Featured Artists

Jane Wong‘s poems can be found in places such as Best American Poetry 2015, American Poetry Review, Poetry, AGNI, Third Coast, New England Review, and others. A Kundiman fellow, she is the author of Overpour from Action Books, and How to Not Be Afraid of Everything, which is forthcoming from Alice James Books. She is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at WWU.

Quenton Baker is a poet, educator, and Cave Canem fellow. His current focus is anti-blackness and the afterlife of slavery. His work has appeared in The Offing, Jubilat, Vinyl and elsewhere. He has an MFA in Poetry from the University of Southern Maine and is a two-time Pushcart Prize nominee. He is the recipient of the 2016 James W. Ray Venture Project Award and 2018 Arts Innovator Award from Artist Trust, and is a 2019 Robert Rauschenberg Artist in Residence. He is the author of This Glittering Republic (Willow Books, 2016).

Shayla Lawson is the author of three books of poetry—A Speed Education in Human Being, the chapbook PANTONE and I Think I’m Ready to see Frank Ocean—and the forthcoming essay collection THIS IS MAJOR (Harper Perennial, 2020).  Her work has appeared in print & online at Tin House, PAPER, ESPN, Salon,  Guernica, & others.  She curates The Tenderness Project with Ross Gay and writes poems with Chet’la Sebree (pronounced Shayla, no relation). A MacDowell and Yaddo Artist Colony Fellow, Shayla Lawson is a member of The Affrilachian Poets & currently serves as Writer-in-Residence and Director of Creative Writing at Amherst College.

Santi Elijah Holley was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, spent some time in southwest Colorado, returned to Michigan, then moved across the country to Portland, Oregon, where he has lived since 2004. His essays, short stories, reviews, and journalism have appeared in numerous outlets, including The Atlantic, The Guardian, VICE, Tin House, Atlas Obscura, Paste, The Outline, Topic, Sojourners, Pacifica Literary Review, The Portland Mercury, The Stranger, and Longreads. His work has been cited in Best American Essays 2018, and he is a recipient of the 2017 Oregon Literary Fellowship for nonfiction, awarded by Literary Arts. He is currently writing a book for Bloomsbury’s 33 1/3 music book series about Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ Murder Ballads album.

Holley is also a working DJ, who usually performs under the moniker DJ Blind Bartimaeus. In addition to regular nights at bars and clubs in Portland, he has also opened for touring bands, performed at weddings, private parties, corporate events, and festivals, including the Pickathon music festival, Soul’d Out music festival, and Oregon’s culinary Feast festival.
Click the links above for writing and upcoming DJ dates.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Spin Cycle 321 Broadway E, Seattle, WA 98102

8:00pm

Making of Seattle
Veteran food writer Julien Perry worked with the city’s most intriguing chefs to pull together a book filled with two of their favorite recipes. Although this seems like a straightforward task, Perry will share the behind-the-scenes process of developing a cookbook that also included translating the professional creations of diverse chefs into recipes that can work for home cooks. This is a must-attend session for anyone who has considered penning their own cookbook or collaborating on a community-based recipe project. Samples of a couple recipes will be available for noshing. Hosted by Kathleen Flinn.

Featured Artists

Julien Perry has been a food and lifestyle writer and editor for more than twenty years and has worked as a food editor for Seattle Weekly, Seattle Business Magazine, Eater Seattle, and Seattle Magazine. Her work has also been featured in Food & Wine and on the Food Network. An alumnus of Seattle Art Institute’s Baking and Pastry program, she co-founded the One Night Only Project―a roving dinner series that partners with the city’s food and beverage powerhouses―and Chefodex, a chef-for hire service featuring a roster of Seattle’s foremost culinary talent.


Tickets are $5
https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4414464


 


Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Elliott Bay Book Company 1521 10th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Playing in the Dark: Works inspired by Toni Morrison
No matter what stage we are at as artists, we need our mentors- the beacons that guide us through the fog and darkness and storms. Toni Morrison has been just that. And we will try to honor her trailblazing a semblance of justice in our own ways because as she said in 'Sula,' "I don’t want to make somebody else. I want to make myself.”

Featured Artists:

Daemond Arrindell is a poet, playwright, performer and teaching artist. He is a 2013 Jack Straw Writer and a 2014 VONA Writer’s Workshop fellow. He has written for City Arts, Specter, Crosscut, Poetry NorthWest, Seattle Review of Books and co-adapted the acclaimed novel “Welcome To Braggsville,” by T. Geronimo Johnson into a stage production for Book-It Repertory Theater and earlier this year performed his first one-man show, “Frozen Borders,” a performative exploration in imagery, poetry and emotion on the subject of the United States’ southern border.

Naa Akua, 2019 Citizen University Poet-in-Residence, a queer poet, emcee, and actor. They are a WITS writer-in-residence at Franklin High School. Intentionality, love, and encouragement is the focus of Akua’s work that can be found in tracks like “The Elements” or “Till It All Goes Away” from their mixtape Odd(s) Balance (on SoundCloud.com). Naa Akua was a cast member of Book-it Repertory Theater’s adaptation of T. Geronimo Johnson’s “Welcome to Braggsville”, a cast member for Theater Schmeater’s production of “Welcome to Arroyo’s” and a participant of an original boilesque ballet called “Tailfeathers”. Naa Akua’s one person show, Akwaaba The Healing of A Queer Black Soul ran as part of Gay City’s Mosaic program and recently Earth Pearl Collectives, Sovereign Queer Black Womyn Festival. When Akua is not writing and performing they are facilitating Sound Healing sessions which focus on breathing, being in the body and meditation.

Natalie A. Martínez is an activist, poet and scholar of rhetorical studies. She received her PhD in Rhetoric, Composition, and Linguistics from Arizona State University. Her research and writing has focused on the rhetoric of anger and melancholia among queer LatinX writers / artists/ & activists and the productive ways those emotions have been mobilized.

Her poetry and non-fiction has been published in Ellipsis, Nepantla: A Journal of Queer Poets of Color, and the art zine, La Norda Specialo among others. She is a member of the Alice gallery curatorial collective (with Julia Freeman, Dan Paz, Thea Quiray Tagle, Bettina Judd, Julia Heineccius, & Minh Nguyen).

Juan Carlos Reyes has published the novellaA Summer's Lynching (Quarterly West) and the fiction chapbook Elements of a Bystander(Arcadia Press). His stories, poems and essays have appeared in Florida Review, Waccamaw Journal, and Hawai’i Review, among others. He was the recipient of the 2018 Gar LaSalle Artist Trust Storytller Grant and is a former writing fellow with the Jack Straw Cutural Center. He received his MFA from The University of Alabama and has taught poetry and fiction with the Alabama Prison Arts + Education Project. He sits on the board of the Seattle City of Literature organization and serves as an Assistant Professor of creative writing at Seattle University. He also serves as the chief editor of Big Fiction magazine (bigfictionmagazine.com).


Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
The Pine Box 1600 Melrose Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

8:00pm

Surreal Storytelling With Strange Women
Inspired by strange women and surreal storytellers like Aimee Bender, Alissa Nutting, and Catherynne M. Valente, Kate dreamed of creating a platform to showcase voices of the peculiar. Surreal Storytelling with Strange Women was born August 2018. At each Surreal Storytelling event, four women take the stage to provide an evocative evening seeping with poetry, prose, and personal anecdotes. The setting is soft, yet severe. Demanding, magical, bewitching. Kate strives to shine the light not only on established authors but emerging writers as well.  www.surrealstorytelling.com

About the Artists

Kate Berwanger is a short fiction writer and literary event producer in Seattle. Her passion lies in tactile storytelling and curating atmospheric literary affairs with a focus on women writers and the LGBTQ community. She is the proud founder of Assembly Open Mic for literary works in progress and Surreal Storytelling with Strange Women. www.kateberwanger.com.

Ellen Meny lives in Seattle, Washington. She writes weird fantasy, horror and sci-fi. She began her illustrious career writing Pokémon fanfiction in middle school, and hasn’t graduated much past that. Her muse is her hamster, Peachy Keen. She has work in Aether/Ichor, the Papeachu Review and the short story anthology Five Minutes at Hotel Stormcove. Head to her website at www.ellenmeny.com to see more of her work.

A storyteller from St. Louis, MO, Jalayna Carter studied literature and journalism in the Midwest before moving to Seattle and pursuing nonprofit communications. The 2018 Jack Straw Writers Fellow and Artist Trust GAP recipient is fascinated by experimental poetic perspectives and deconstructing the taboo. Her work has appeared in Dryland, Puerto Del Sol, Reality Beach, the 2Leaf Press anthology Black Lives Have Always Mattered, and the 2018 Jack Straw Writers Anthology, among other publications. Her work lives at JalaynaCarter.com.

Vivian Hua (華婷婷) is a writer, filmmaker, and organizer with semi-nomadic tendencies. As the Executive Director of Northwest Film Forum in Seattle, a Co-Founder of the civil rights film series, The Seventh Art Stand, and Editor-in-Chief of the interdisciplinary arts publication, REDEFINE, much of her work unifies her metaphysical interests with her belief that art can positively transform the self and society. Her narrative short film, Searching Skies–which touches on the controversial topic of Syrian refugee resettlement in the United States–was released in 2018. She is currently writing a comedic webseries and researching national efforts to preserve cultural space.

Born in the throes of the frigid chill on a Monday in November in Maine, Kate Bernatche was weathered for severity since the beginning. Her writing mirrors the hard and soft parts of human existence. Always having a fondness for words, she's started (and rarely ended) countless notebooks, poems, short stories and potential novellas. With a voracious hunger to delve into human living and the psyche, Kate writes to dissect and present characters, intending to encompass the ever evolving notion of singular life.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 8:45pm
Corvus & Co 601 Broadway E, Seattle, WA 98102

8:00pm

Spirited Stone: Lessons from Kubota’s Garden

Join Hugo House and Kubota Garden for an evening of stories and poetry celebrating the launch of SPIRITED STONE: LESSONS FROM KUBOTA'S GARDEN, an anthology honoring the legacy of Fujitaro Kubota, whose unique gardens transformed Seattle’s regional landscape in the 20th century.

A self-taught gardener, Kubota built a thriving landscape business, eventually assembling 20 acres in south Seattle that he shaped into a beautiful and enduring Japanese garden. Today, this public park serves one of Washington’s most diverse zip codes.

An innovator and artist, Kubota created the first “drive-through” garden to capitalize on America’s love for the automobile. While incarcerated at Minidoka prison camp during World War II, Kubota converted stripped, barren spaces into gardens of respite, respect, and beauty. To Kubota, everything has spirit. Rocks and stones pulsed with life, he said, and that energy is still apparent in his gardens today.

Spirited Stone is published with generous support from the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust; Pendleton and Elisabeth Carey Miller Charitable Foundation; Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund; David R. Coffin Publication Grant from Foundation for Landscape Studies; 4Culture; and Robert Chinn Foundation. This community event is supported by a Neighborhood Matching Fund grant from Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. 

ABOUT THE READERS

Former Washington State Poet Laureate (2014–16) ELIZABETH AUSTEN earned her MFA in creative writing at Antioch University-Los Angeles in 2001, and teaches at Hugo House. Elizabeth has been a visiting artist for the Anacortes, La Conner, Mount Vernon, Seattle, and Sedro Woolley, Washington school districts, and for the Austin, Texas ArtSpark Festival. She’s led workshops for Burning Word, Field’s End, Highline Community College, Poets in the Park, Puget Sound Writers Program and the Washington Center for the Book.

SHANKAR NARAYAN is the winner of the 2017 Flyway Sweet Corn Poetry Prize, and a former fellow at Kundiman and at Hugo House. He curates Claiming Space, a project to lift the voices of writers of color, and his chapbook, POSTCARDS FROM THE NEW WORLD, won the Paper Nautilus Debut Series chapbook prize. Shankar draws strength from his global upbringing and from his work as a civil rights attorney for the ACLU. In Seattle, he awakens to the wonders of Cascadia every day, but his heart yearns east to his other hometown, Delhi.

ALEX GALLO-BROWN is a poet, fiction writer, and essayist based in Seattle. He holds an MA in English from Georgia State University in Atlanta and a BFA in creative writing from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. He received an emerging artist awards from WonderRoot and the City of Atlanta, and has been published in the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Brooklyn Rail, Salon.com, Literary Hub, The Stranger, Seattle Weekly, Poetry Northwest, Crosscut, the Oregonian, and 3:AM magazine, Pacifica Literary Review, Seattle Review of Books, City Arts, Cirque, Cascadia Rising Review, and the Grief Diaries, among others.

Thursday October 24, 2019 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Hugo House 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

9:00pm

Jack Straw Poetry Reading
All writing that matters to me nudges at the unknown, takes chances,” writes 2019 Jack Straw Writers Program Curator Kathleen Flenniken in the 2019 Jack Straw Writers Anthology. “Reading it is an act of discovery, which can be uncomfortable, upsetting, touching, revelatory.” Kathleen will host, introducing some of the 2019 Jack Straw Writers and their uncomfortable, upsetting, touching, revelatory work.

Featured Artists

Christianne Balk grew up in upstate New York, studied biology and art at Grinnell College, English and writing at the University of Iowa, taught at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and now lives in Seattle. Her poems have appeared in Cirque, Poemoftheweek.org, Women Writing Nature, Floating Bridge Review, Nimrod, Terrain, and other publications. Christianne loves gardening, the Anglo-Saxon rhythms of everyday street talk, and open water swimming. Her most recent book is The Holding Hours (University of Washington Press Pacific Northwest Poetry Series).

Rena Priest is a writer and Lummi tribal member. Her debut book, Patriarchy Blues, was released on MoonPath Press and garnered an American Book Award. Her most recent collection, Sublime Subliminal, was published by Floating Bridge Press in 2018. She has attended residencies at Mineral School, Underwater New York/Works on Water on Governors Island, and Hawthornden Castle International Retreat for Writers. She is the recipient of a 2018 National Geographic Explorers Grant, and has taught various topics in writing, storytelling, and literature.


Sylvia Byrne Pollack’s poems have appeared in Floating Bridge Review, Crab Creek Review, Clover, and Antiphon, as well as other print and online journals. A two-time Pushcart nominee, she won the 2013 Mason's Road Winter Literary Award and was a medalist for the 2014 inaugural Russell Prize. Her chapbook manuscript, 'Overheard: The Deaf Woman Poems' was a 2018 finalist for the Two Sylvias Press Chapbook Prize. She is currently creating new work as a 2019 Jack Straw Writing Fellow.




Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
Spin Cycle 321 Broadway E, Seattle, WA 98102

9:00pm

Say My Name: Heroes, Lovers and Liars
We have all had heroes, lovers and liars in our lives. Their names may be different than the ones you call out when you need help, when you are in ecstasy, and when you can't get over them runnin' game. Warning: Names may or may not be changed to protect the innocent and guilty.

Featured Artists

Seattle's Civic Poet, Jourdan Imani Keith, is a student of Sonia Sanchez, a poet, essayist, playwright, naturalist and activist. Her writing blends the textures of political, personal and natural landscapes to offer voices from the margins of American lives.  A recipient of the 2018 Americans for the Arts award, her TEDx Talk, "Your Body of Water" became the theme for King County's 2016-2018 Poetry on Buses program. Her Orion Magazine essays, “Desegregating Wilderness” and “At Risk,” were selected for the 2015 Best American Science and Nature Writing Anthology  She has been awarded fellowships from Hedgebrook, Wildbranch, Santa Fe Science Writing workshop, VONA, and Jack Straw. Seattle Public Library’s first naturalist-in-Residence, Keith is the founder and director of Urban Wilderness Project. She's received awards from University of Washington, Artist Trust, 4Culture and Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Her memoir in essays, Tugging at the Web is forthcoming from University of Washington Press.

Roberto Ascalon teaches poetry across Seattle. Ascalon’s poem “The Fire This Time, or, How Come Some Brown Boys Get Blazed Right Before Class And Other Questions Without Marks” won the 2013 Rattle Poetry Prize and a Pushcart nomination. He’s been a writing fellow with Kundiman and Jack Straw. His teaching artist residencies have led to several multimedia exhibitions at the Frye Art Museum, the SAM and MOHAI, one of which, earned him a trip to the White House where he had the honor of shaking hands with President Obama. In 2013 Ascalon helped Seattle revive its beloved Poetry on Buses program. He received his MFA in Creative Writing from Western Washington University in 2016. He currently works at The Greater Seattle Bureau of Fearless Ideas.

Monique Franklin (Verbal Oasis), is an activist, poet, performer, scientist, and mother from Seattle. She has been referred to as “The unofficial poet laureate of South Seattle”, "The Billie Holiday of Spoken Word" as well as "the Verbal Manifestation of Nina Simone's Soul". Monique is a 10+ year member of African American Writer's Alliance and has self-published two volumes of poetry entitled “Acoustic Accolades” and “Erotic Annals of a Poet”. She has released two albums of poetry Acoustic Accolades Volume 1 and Hot Summer Nights. She is currently working on a one woman show entitled Mama'z Muezz that will open in the Fall of 2020 and co-host and co-produces Afrodisiac Erotic Poetry Show celebrating the diversity and sexuality of people of color. Learn more about this creative soul at www.verbaloasis.com.


Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
Capitol Cider 818 E Pike St, Seattle, WA 98122

9:00pm

Scary Stories to Tell in the Bar
Horror sits on the edge of expectation: the space between what people are comfortable with and what will surprise them. Cozy up with three of Seattle's best horror writers, Jarret Middleton, Chavisa Woods, Ramon Isao, and host Christina Montilla for a night of spooky fiction.

Featured Artists

Jarret Middleton is the author of Darkansas and the novella, An Dantomine Eerly. He was the founding editor of Seattle’s Dark Coast Press and the classics library Pharos Editions, an imprint of Counterpoint/Soft Skull. His fiction, essays, and reviews have appeared in Shelf Awareness, The Quarterly Conversation, The Weeklings, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Collagist, SmokeLong Quarterly, and HTMLGIANT. He teaches a novel bootcamp and a class on literary horror at Richard Hugo House.

Author of 100 Times (A Memoir of Sexism), the short story collection, Things To Do When You’re Goth in the Country, and two other books, Chavisa Woods is a MacDowell Fellow and the recipient of the Shirley Jackson Award, the Kathy Acker Award in writing, the Cobalt Fiction Prize, and was a three time Lambda Literary Award finalist. She has appeared on The Young Turks, NPR’s 1A, and as a featured performer at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her writing has appeared in Tin House, LitHub, Electric Lit, The Brooklyn Rail, The Evergreen Review, New York Quarterly, and many other publications.

Ramon Isao is a recipient of The Tim McGinnis Award for Fiction, as well as fellowships from Artist Trust and Jack Straw Cultural Center. His work appears in The Iowa Review, Ninth Letter, Hobart, The American Reader, and what have you. His screenplay credits include Zombies of Mass Destruction, Dead Body, and Grow Op (in which he co-stars). He is the assistant fiction editor at New Orleans Review, and teaches writing classes at Hugo House.


Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
The Pine Box 1600 Melrose Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

9:00pm

Weed The People
Meet the people making waves in the cannabis industry as they honor the plant that so many creatives turn to for inspiration. Come celebrate the other legal way to get lit in Washington and listen to spoken word by two canna-friendly poets, Nadia Imafidon and Leila Marie Ali. Hosted by Ahnya Smith, founder of the Colored Cannabis Collective.

Featured Artists

Born into an Army family, Ahnya Smith moved to Seattle in 2017 from Virginia and has found her place in the cannabis industry here in the Emerald City. The founder and president of the Colored Cannabis Collective, Ahnya spends a lot of her time brainstorming community service ideas, ways to build a stronger cannabis community, and how to give POC in cannabis their fair shot in the industry while righting the wrongs of the War on Drugs. With her family originally from New Orleans, Ahnya is no stranger to a good time and when she’s not focused on CCC she can be found on the stage performing in drag as Skarlet Dior Black.

Leila Marie Ali uses her middle name to increase her SEO rating as most confuse her with Muhammad Ali's daughter. Leila Marie Ali would have you all know that she is the lover not the fighter. This DC native is from the original Washington but Seattle has been home for the last 5+ years. By day she runs The Herban Adventure Tour, Seattle's best and only cannabis culture tour which offers a seed to sale or history to the future type of experience exploring the 502 industry in the state of Washington. By night she performs historical or political spoken word around the city most recently featured on the show Sound Effects on KNKQ. Leila is currently writing a musical about women around the turn of the 20th century. Think Hamilton meets Drunk History due to be released early next year

Nadia Imafidon is an unapologetic Nigerian-American spoken word poet who stays hustling. She volunteers at the King County Juvenile Detention Center where she writes poetry with youth, and co-hosts The Table Podcast, where she and Isaac Sanders have table conversations about the black, queer, and femme experience living in the PNW. She believes in the power of language and storytelling to build community and inspire healing and change.

Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
Rachel's Ginger Beer 1610 12th ave seattle, wa 98122

9:00pm

Winter in America
More than just the man who predicted the revolution wont be televised, Gil Scot Heron left an Indelible imprint on our culture.

He was often brilliant, sometimes his own troubled unreliable narrator, and sometimes both at the same time.
In this reading, we will read poems inspired by or responding to many of the facets of his complex art.

Featured Artists

A 2016 Jack Straw Fellow, Artist Trust Fellow, and nominee for a Stranger Genius Award, Robert Lashley has had poems published in such journals as Feminete, Seattle Review of Books, NAILED, Gramma, Poetry Northwest, Cascadia Magazine, and The Cascadia Review. His work was also featured in Many Trails to the Summit , an anthology of Northwest form and lyric poetry, and It Was Written, an anthology of poetry inspired by hip hop.

Paul Hlava Ceballos is the recipient of a 2019-2020 Artist Trust Fellowship award, as well as a Poets House fellowship, and a 4Culture Artist Grant. He was part of Cave Canem’s Writing-Across Cultures workshop and has been published in the Best New Poets Anthology. His work has been published in Narrative Magazine, BOMB, the PEN Poetry Series, Acentos Review, the LA Times, among other journals and newspapers, and have been nominated for the Pushcart. He has an MFA from NYU and currently lives in Seattle, where he practices echocardiography.

Christopher Rose is originally from Seattle, Washington. His poems have appeared in Fjords Review, TAYO Literary Magazine, The Hawaii Review, Vinyl Poetry, FreezeRay, and others. He is a Cave Canem fellow and VONA alum, and is a 2019 recipient of an Oregon Literary Fellowship for Writers of Color. He currently teaches at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon.

Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
Bauhaus 515 Harvard Ave East #121 Seattle, WA 98102

9:00pm

Writing Against the Body
Four writers explore the personal, familial, and cultural friction that arises in a body in conflict with itself and its homes.

Featured Artists




Joyce Chen is a writer/editor/creator from LA who spent a decade in NYC before relocating back to the West Coast in fall 2017. She has covered entertainment and human interest stories for Rolling Stone, the New York Daily News, and People, among others, and her creative writing credits include LitHub, Narratively, and Barrelhouse, among others. She is interested in topics like time, silence, and liminal spaces as they relate to agency, power, and intercultural understanding. She is one of the cofounders of The Seventh Wave, a bicoastal arts and literary nonprofit, and holds an MFA from The New School and a BA in journalism and psychology from USC. She is currently working on a collection of essays that examine the friction that arises from living with two sets of values that are often at odds with one another—the American ideals of independence and self-fulfillment and the Taiwanese values of family, community, and sacrifice—as experienced through different modes of time perception.




Laura Wachs is a poet and performer born in Seoul, South Korea and raised in Seattle, Washington. She's been performing for the past decade and has featured at Seattle Poetry Slam, Rain City Slam, The Round and Antioch University among others around the state. She curates benefit shows and has supported non profits including the Crisis Clinic of King Country, KUMFA for Korean unwed mothers, ASK for Korean adoptees and Dding Dong LGBT Youth Shelter. She most recently had her first poetry anthology, "The Motherland" published, which explores narratives of adoptees and single mothers in Korea. More of her work can be found on Drunk in a Midnight Choir, KAAN and Ildaro magazine and the Breadline Anthology. She loves hugs, tattoos and dogs. 




Laura Titzer defines herself as a maker of webinars, workshops, trainings, essays, books, blog posts, poems, baked goods, pestos and quilts. She writes about social change, feminism, and decentering white dominant culture. Laura has worked at varying agriculture, economic development, extension, activist and nonprofit agencies promoting social change and food justice. Laura’s core desire is to design spaces for people to emerge into their best selves and co-create new ways of being.




Abi Pollokoff is a Seattle-based writer and book artist with work previously in CutBank, Poetry Northwest, The Spectacle, and Black Warrior Review, among others. A 2019 Hugo House Fellow, she has been the poet in residence for the Seattle Review of Books and The Alice. Currently, she is the events manager for Open Books: A Poem Emporium, the managing editor for Poetry Northwest Editions, and a content director in visual communications. She received her MFA from the University of Washington. Find her at abipollokoff.com 






Thursday October 24, 2019 9:00pm - 9:45pm
Ada's Technical Books & Cafe 425 15th Ave E, Seattle, WA 98112

10:00pm

After Party 2019!
Help bring Seattle’s spookiest literary night to an end with the Lit Crawl 2019: After Party at Hugo House. After an evening mingling with the city’s literati, unwind with a drink, a tarot reading, a dance. At the After Party, check out our spooky surprises and pick up books from some of your favorite authors. 




At the end of it all, give one last toast to Lit Crawl 2019, the ghosts who drive us forward, and to the readings to come.




Thursday October 24, 2019 10:00pm - 11:30pm
Hugo House 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122